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  • Writer's pictureTexas Family Project

An Update: Several Pro-Family Bills Held Hostage in Court

Last Friday, September 1st, many of the laws passed through the Texas Legislature became law. While the 88th Legislative Session was a successful one, we knew we still had plenty of work in front of us.


That was before several Pro-Family bills were blocked in court.


HB 900: The READER Act


U.S. District Court Judge Alan Albright has decided to block House Bill 900 from taking effect. This law, passed by the Texas Legislature, was a straightforward measure designed to keep sexually explicit, vulgar, and educationally unsuitable material out of school libraries. But apparently, according to Judge Albright, protecting our children from inappropriate content is now a violation of the Constitution.

The Law and Its Purpose

HB 900 was a direct response to months of parental outrage over the kind of filth found in school libraries. The law wasn't some draconian measure; it was a common-sense solution to a real problem. It required vendors to rate and label books based on sexual content, ensuring that schools would only purchase appropriate materials. But Judge Albright made a move that reeks of judicial activism when he decided that the state of Texas and its parents don't have the right to decide what's best for their children.

The Flimsy Lawsuit

The lawsuit that led to this outrageous decision was filed by a coalition of book vendors who claimed the law is "unconstitutionally vague and overbroad." This is nothing but a thinly veiled attempt to undermine the will of the people and the safety of our children. The law is not vague or overbroad; it's specific and targeted, aimed at keeping inappropriate material away from impressionable minds.


SB 12: Federal Judge Blocks Law on Drag Shows, Ignoring the Well-Being of Children


U.S. District Court Judge David Hittner has temporarily halted a law designed to defend kids from sexual performances, including those in drag shows. Contrary to misleading narratives, this law is not about "restricting drag shows"; it's about safeguarding the innocence of our youth. Yet, Judge Hittner has chosen to interpret this as a violation of First Amendment rights, a decision

that serves adult interests at the expense of our children's well-being. Judge Hittner's decision prioritizes the desires of adult performers over the safety of our children.


NEWSFLASH: Grown adult men DO NOT have a constitutional right to strip for children.


HB 1181: Federal Judge Sabotages Texas Law Designed to Shield Children from Pornography, Prioritizes Perverse Interests Over Child Safety

U.S. District Judge David Ezra has blocked a law that was specifically crafted to defend our kids from the corrosive influence of pornography. House Bill 1181, which was set to take effect last week, aimed to require age verification and health warnings on pornographic websites. Judge Ezra, in a decision that can only be described as morally bankrupt, has decided that the so-called "First Amendment rights" of the adult entertainment industry are more important than the safety and well-being of our nation's youth.


The Real Issue: The Moral Fabric of Society vs. Degenerate Interests

This isn't merely a legal dispute; it's a battle for the soul of our society. The ruling is a glaring testament to a judicial system gone awry, one that places perverse adult interests above the irrefutable need to protect our children. Let's not mince words: pornography is a scourge, harmful to all, and especially destructive to the young.

While we await these bills to go through the judicial process, we still have a lot to celebrate. SB 14, which largely ends the chemical castration and genital mutilation of our kids went into effect, as did SB 15, the Save Women’s Sports Act.


One thing is for certain: Even though we had big wins last session, the fight for the family and to defend our kids from the Anti-Family Left is far from over. We must stay vigilant and work to ensure these laws only get stronger in the future.


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